Hey, Kruz!

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by Inkara1, Oct 28, 2005.

  1. Inkara1

    Inkara1 New Member

    I tried to PM you when I saw you here but I guess you'd just left.

    Anyways, the back wheels on my car make a "sshuh" sound with every revolution. When I jack up the car, the wheel seems hard to turn for half the revolution and very easy to turn for the other half. Both rears are like that. I don't think it's the brakes because it makes the exact same sound when I'm driving whether I'm accelerating, coasting or stopping. I'm suspecting the bearings, although the noice is the same whether I'm turning or going straight and at any speed.

    Am I correct in assuming it's the bearings? The sound's been there for a couple of years, probably. I don't remember if it amde the sound when I first got the car in MAy 2003, though.
     
  2. Inkara1

    Inkara1 New Member

    So I took off the left rear brake drum and the bearing didn't make the noise without the drum on it. So I got the drum back on, used the rubber mallet to make sure it was back on straight and everything and after I put the wheel back on, it didn't make the noise anymore and the wheel didn't seem to have the brakes on half the revolution anymore.

    So I drove it about 160 miles round trip to go cover a football game, and it's making the noise again.
     
  3. Kruz

    Kruz Moderator Staff Member

    it sounds like the drums may be out of round, also that the brake shoes may not be returning to the full off position after some driving.. brake dust can keep the shoes from moving freely and returning to the stops.
    what I would do is, first get some brake cleaner and thoroughly clean out the shoes and backing plates. when dry take some grease and put a dab behind each spot where the shoes contact the plate. then adjust the self adjuster so there is a slight drag while rotating the wheel.
    and if it still makes noise.. get the drums machined.
     
  4. Inkara1

    Inkara1 New Member

    Would I feel anything different in the pedal if the drums were out of round? The pedal feels normal.
     
  5. Kruz

    Kruz Moderator Staff Member

    most of the braking is done up front and easier to diagnose.. for the rear, go to a parking lot and get moving about 15-20mph, then gently apply the parking brake and feel for any pulsating .. this eliminates the front brakes and if it is smooth, they are fine
     
  6. Professur

    Professur Mushroom at large

    Got a sec Kruz? I've a question about replacing the thermostat on a dodge Colt (mitsu mirage)
     
  7. Kruz

    Kruz Moderator Staff Member

    I'll help if I can.. not very informed on those cars, and info is tough to get.. but ask away
     
  8. Professur

    Professur Mushroom at large

    It's more concerning the installation. I've always used a paper gasket and gasket dope, but I've heard that now RTV is use alone as the gasket.
     
  9. Kruz

    Kruz Moderator Staff Member

    most stuff went to RTV.. that's what we use 80% of the time. use black RTV and use it sparingly :)

    I don't have to tell you about getting the surface as clean as possible first , right? :)
     
  10. Professur

    Professur Mushroom at large

    Nope. got the putty knife in the tool box. I just wasn't sure about going without a gasket. That's what happens when you learn mechanics on a 1970 chevy straight 6. I still can't ask for spark plugs without saying plugs and points.

    Now I just need to check about using RTV in sub zero. It's friggin snowing now.

    looks like Dad got it changed to one of those that fail open, and now I simply cannot get the car to warm up at all. It's killing my gas milage, running in open loop.

    thanks Kruz.
     
  11. Kruz

    Kruz Moderator Staff Member

    that's better then failing closed and overheating. :)
     
  12. Professur

    Professur Mushroom at large

    Yeah, but at least then, you get the damn thing fixed, instead of putting it off until there's snow on the ground and you're trying to drain coolant wearing mittens.
     
  13. Nixy

    Nixy Administrator Staff Member

    Try gloves ;)
     
  14. Professur

    Professur Mushroom at large

    Obviously, you've no clue how cold a wrench stays once it's cold. It's a wonderful heatsink. Gloves = frostbite. You absolutely have to keep those fingers together. I've seen skin damage from holding a rachet at barely 0c. Temps that bare skin in the air doesn't take any damage at all. Add any moisture at all, and you're in a lot of trouble in a hurry. And this might suprise you (although it shouldn't) automotive coolant is a great conductor for heat and cold. Much better than straight water. Wet leather or nylon holding a wrench is very dangerous.

    Woollen mitts, on the other hand, wick moisture away, and keep the fingers together. Wool retains better insulation than anything else, even when immersed in water. (As a Canuck, you really should know this already) That's why you're supposed to wear wool socks in your boots. Keeps your feet warmer if you sweat.
     
  15. Kruz

    Kruz Moderator Staff Member

    rubbing my hands together for warmth in our 60 deg coldness> :rofl:
     

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